Commercial Cellulosic Ethanol Production Still Years Away

Chuck Zimmerman

Our latest ZimmPoll asked the question, “How many years before cellulosic ethanol matches corn ethanol production?” So what did you say? 42% said More than ten years; 23% said Five to ten years; 18% said Five years; 14% said Never and 3% said Next year. We’ve seen huge strides in the efficiency of corn ethanol production and research on the use of new feedstocks but we’re not quite there for mass quantity cellulosic production. Will we be? What do you think? Feel free to add your comments here.

Our new ZimmPoll is now live. We’re asking the question, “Which is more important to rural America: GPS Service or Broadband Internet?” We thought it would be interesting you get your thoughts on this in light of the Lightsquared rural broadband service that seems to pose some serious problems for GPS service. Your input and thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

ZimmPoll is sponsored by Rhea+Kaiser, a full-service advertising/public relations agency.

ZimmPoll

Comments 4

  1. I have many negative opinions of this entire backroom deal and threat to GPS, however, to frame this as a “GPS vs rural broadband coverage” argument seems to be specious. The notion that widespread rural broadband is a priority for LightSquared was clearly debunked by Glenn Borkenhagen who used LightSquared’s filings with the FCC to conclude the following (ltr dated 11 Aug 11):

    “Unfortunately, if we look beyond LightSquared’s press releases and public-relations materials and instead examine LightSquared’s official filings with the FCC, it appears that serving the rural areas of the United
    States with anything that can reasonably be characterized as “broadband” internet access is not one of LightSquared’s priorities.

    As detailed in the following pages, LightSquared states that its terrestrial deployment plan for the next several years will cover “only 12 percent of the U.S. land mass” and that it will be “many years” before their wireless-broadband network reaches into much of rural America. LightSquared will serve the vast majority of the country’s land area with minimal satellite-internet service that falls far short of being internet-access service capable of adequately supporting 21st-century citizens, governments, and businesses….”

    Full letter at the following url:
    http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=7021702011

    Also, considering the fact that LightSquared is only going to be the wholesaler of the service, any kind of rural coverage is going to depend on yet another commercial entity that may have even less incentive to provide it.

    In my opinion, LightSquared has provided a lot of PR on rural broadbankd with very little to back it up. Certainly not enough to risk the precision GPS, modernization of our Air Traffic Control system (NextGen), and Galileo for the European Community.

  2. I have many negative opinions of this entire backroom deal and threat to GPS, however, to frame this as a “GPS vs rural broadband coverage” argument seems to be specious. The notion that widespread rural broadband is a priority for LightSquared was clearly debunked by Glenn Borkenhagen who used LightSquared’s filings with the FCC to conclude the following (ltr dated 11 Aug 11):

    “Unfortunately, if we look beyond LightSquared’s press releases and public-relations materials and instead examine LightSquared’s official filings with the FCC, it appears that serving the rural areas of the United
    States with anything that can reasonably be characterized as “broadband” internet access is not one of LightSquared’s priorities.

    As detailed in the following pages, LightSquared states that its terrestrial deployment plan for the next several years will cover “only 12 percent of the U.S. land mass” and that it will be “many years” before their wireless-broadband network reaches into much of rural America. LightSquared will serve the vast majority of the country’s land area with minimal satellite-internet service that falls far short of being internet-access service capable of adequately supporting 21st-century citizens, governments, and businesses….”

    Full letter at the following url:
    http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=7021702011

    Also, considering the fact that LightSquared is only going to be the wholesaler of the service, any kind of rural coverage is going to depend on yet another commercial entity that may have even less incentive to provide it.

    In my opinion, LightSquared has provided a lot of PR on rural broadbankd with very little to back it up. Certainly not enough to risk the precision GPS, modernization of our Air Traffic Control system (NextGen), and Galileo for the European Community.

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