AgNewsWire.AgWired.com vs. NFBS?

Chuck Zimmerman

I’m often asked what the difference is between our AgNewsWire.AgWired.com service and the NAFB member service called NFBS. Then today I received an email from a client of ours that contained a report from the NFBS showing which NAFB members (by name and company) downloaded their audio files. This client wondered if we could provide the same information. The short answer is “no.”

Since we started our AgNewsWire.AgWired.com/Talking News Release service we have viewed the download identity of the journalists we email news releases to as confidential. To start with, we polled several journalists for their opinion and were told that if we ever identified them personally to our client and they found out it would be the last time they ever used releases sent by us. No other newswire service I know of reports this either. Additionally, although I understand why companies and organizations want to know who downloaded their release or any multi-media files that are included, there’s a danger to the journalist of that information being used to reward or punish their station, magazine or website.

So, there’s one difference between our service and NAFB’s member service. We will supply our client with the number of times an audio file, picture file or release document is downloaded. That doesn’t violate anyone’s privacy. Also, after trying to measure opens/click thru’s with our current system we’re moving to a new system that promises to do this efficiently for us.

Some other differences between the two services include; the fact that we individually email news releases to the inbox of the journalists on our list; the fact that we email to NAFB members as well as other broadcasters who aren’t members; the fact that we also email to a comprehensive list of publication and online editors which our clients have helped us develop; the fact that we post all releases to AgNewsWire.AgWired.com.com, a highly search engine-optimized website where they are archived for future retrieval and publicly available; the fact that we distribute more than just text and audio (images, video, etc.).

I hope this helps answer this question. I’ve been asked it several times just in the last week so I guess it’s part of that fall public relations planning process.

By the way, our AgNewsWire.AgWired.com.com site is about to undergo a facelift just like AgWired did a couple weeks ago. I hope you like it when it’s done.

Media, NAFB

Comments 9

  1. Chuck; as a former member you undoubtedly realize that those of us who are “subscribed” to the NAFB News Service are dues paying members of the organization. We pretty much assume that our names, addresses, and other relevant information are available to NAFB’s partners, sponsors, and supporters. Our company finds the relationship between these organizations and businesses to be extremely helpful, and ultimately the flow of information between the two camps (broadcaster and marketer) is mutually beneficial. I think that rather than serving as a potential tool to “punish” of reward specific stations or entities, the data helps marketers learn if they’re doing a good job in providing us with newsworthy content. For example, if the National Widget Coalition posts a story on NAFB, and the story is a stinker, I won’t use it regardless. This is true of all of our content partners; sometimes they provide relevant newsworthy material, and sometimes they provide information that my listeners have no interest in hearing. Ultimately, if one of these content partners want to know what we’re putting on the air, all they have to do is go to our website or subscribe to our podcast.

    That being said, you are using your niche well, and have provided a useful service to both broadcaster and markter. I think both services have a place.

  2. Chuck; as a former member you undoubtedly realize that those of us who are “subscribed” to the NAFB News Service are dues paying members of the organization. We pretty much assume that our names, addresses, and other relevant information are available to NAFB’s partners, sponsors, and supporters. Our company finds the relationship between these organizations and businesses to be extremely helpful, and ultimately the flow of information between the two camps (broadcaster and marketer) is mutually beneficial. I think that rather than serving as a potential tool to “punish” of reward specific stations or entities, the data helps marketers learn if they’re doing a good job in providing us with newsworthy content. For example, if the National Widget Coalition posts a story on NAFB, and the story is a stinker, I won’t use it regardless. This is true of all of our content partners; sometimes they provide relevant newsworthy material, and sometimes they provide information that my listeners have no interest in hearing. Ultimately, if one of these content partners want to know what we’re putting on the air, all they have to do is go to our website or subscribe to our podcast.

    That being said, you are using your niche well, and have provided a useful service to both broadcaster and markter. I think both services have a place.

  3. Chuck; as a former member you undoubtedly realize that those of us who are “subscribed” to the NAFB News Service are dues paying members of the organization. We pretty much assume that our names, addresses, and other relevant information are available to NAFB’s partners, sponsors, and supporters. Our company finds the relationship between these organizations and businesses to be extremely helpful, and ultimately the flow of information between the two camps (broadcaster and marketer) is mutually beneficial. I think that rather than serving as a potential tool to “punish” of reward specific stations or entities, the data helps marketers learn if they’re doing a good job in providing us with newsworthy content. For example, if the National Widget Coalition posts a story on NAFB, and the story is a stinker, I won’t use it regardless. This is true of all of our content partners; sometimes they provide relevant newsworthy material, and sometimes they provide information that my listeners have no interest in hearing. Ultimately, if one of these content partners want to know what we’re putting on the air, all they have to do is go to our website or subscribe to our podcast.

    That being said, you are using your niche well, and have provided a useful service to both broadcaster and markter. I think both services have a place.

  4. Thanks for the comment Andy. I have had numerous chats with members about this whole issue at various conferences. Although you are a published member I don’t think most members realize that the fact that they download files or don’t is reported to the organizations purchasing access through this mechanism. Another question that often comes up is whether audio “aired” or was just listened to. We get asked that same question about our service too. Just because someone downloads or listens to an audio file doesn’t mean it was used.

    The member service was originally created to provide a mechanism for members to share audio with each other and I assume that’s still the case. At some point it became a revenue stream for the organization and is now marketed to the same companies and organizations that purchase commercial advertising time. I assume that’s been good for the organization.

    I really like your comment about your podcasts! Another aspect of internet-delivered audio.

    Thanks for your comments about our service. I agree that each service has its place. It’s been a very good revenue stream for us for going on 3 years now!

    BTW. I’m still a member, just not a broadcast council one.

  5. Thanks for the comment Andy. I have had numerous chats with members about this whole issue at various conferences. Although you are a published member I don’t think most members realize that the fact that they download files or don’t is reported to the organizations purchasing access through this mechanism. Another question that often comes up is whether audio “aired” or was just listened to. We get asked that same question about our service too. Just because someone downloads or listens to an audio file doesn’t mean it was used.

    The member service was originally created to provide a mechanism for members to share audio with each other and I assume that’s still the case. At some point it became a revenue stream for the organization and is now marketed to the same companies and organizations that purchase commercial advertising time. I assume that’s been good for the organization.

    I really like your comment about your podcasts! Another aspect of internet-delivered audio.

    Thanks for your comments about our service. I agree that each service has its place. It’s been a very good revenue stream for us for going on 3 years now!

    BTW. I’m still a member, just not a broadcast council one.

  6. Thanks for the comment Andy. I have had numerous chats with members about this whole issue at various conferences. Although you are a published member I don’t think most members realize that the fact that they download files or don’t is reported to the organizations purchasing access through this mechanism. Another question that often comes up is whether audio “aired” or was just listened to. We get asked that same question about our service too. Just because someone downloads or listens to an audio file doesn’t mean it was used.

    The member service was originally created to provide a mechanism for members to share audio with each other and I assume that’s still the case. At some point it became a revenue stream for the organization and is now marketed to the same companies and organizations that purchase commercial advertising time. I assume that’s been good for the organization.

    I really like your comment about your podcasts! Another aspect of internet-delivered audio.

    Thanks for your comments about our service. I agree that each service has its place. It’s been a very good revenue stream for us for going on 3 years now!

    BTW. I’m still a member, just not a broadcast council one.

  7. As soon as I submitted my comment I said to myself – “Chuck’s still a member, nitwit.”

    The comparison I use on the News Service as a revenue stream is like the Broadcaster Associations allowing individual stations to pay their dues by airing so many publics service announcements. Every radio station in Ohio airs spots for the Ohio National Guard, for example. The Guard isn’t buying the time from every station, but they are buying time from the Ohio Association of Broadcasters.

    Good point also about who’s actually playing the audio as opposed to just sampling it. While I don’t have a problem with NAFB sharing my “download data,” so to speak, I would certainly balk at reporting actual airplay.

  8. As soon as I submitted my comment I said to myself – “Chuck’s still a member, nitwit.”

    The comparison I use on the News Service as a revenue stream is like the Broadcaster Associations allowing individual stations to pay their dues by airing so many publics service announcements. Every radio station in Ohio airs spots for the Ohio National Guard, for example. The Guard isn’t buying the time from every station, but they are buying time from the Ohio Association of Broadcasters.

    Good point also about who’s actually playing the audio as opposed to just sampling it. While I don’t have a problem with NAFB sharing my “download data,” so to speak, I would certainly balk at reporting actual airplay.

  9. As soon as I submitted my comment I said to myself – “Chuck’s still a member, nitwit.”

    The comparison I use on the News Service as a revenue stream is like the Broadcaster Associations allowing individual stations to pay their dues by airing so many publics service announcements. Every radio station in Ohio airs spots for the Ohio National Guard, for example. The Guard isn’t buying the time from every station, but they are buying time from the Ohio Association of Broadcasters.

    Good point also about who’s actually playing the audio as opposed to just sampling it. While I don’t have a problem with NAFB sharing my “download data,” so to speak, I would certainly balk at reporting actual airplay.

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