Farmer iPod Use Growing

Chuck Zimmerman

NAFB Directory 2006According to the latest NAFB eChats they’ve got a new qualitative farmer media use study out that says farmer use of iPods and other digital audio devices has grown to about 5 percent! Actually it doesn’t give an exact number, just says less than 5 percent but I’m sure there’s a plus/minus error factor to consider too. This seems like pretty fast growth to me when you consider that they didn’t even exist just a couple years ago. I guess it’s kind of like radio back when it got started. How many farmer had one in the first 2 years? Was it 5 percent?

This is great to get a benchmark we can use in coming years on farmer use of internet delivered, time-shifted audio and video content. The rapidly increasing availability of broadband and mobile technology will continue to drive this medium shift. This week I’ve discussed this topic with several industry communications professionals. We all concluded that it’s worth investing in this new distribution technology because we believe it will continue to grow. I like this analogy that Cindy brought up. Look at all the investment in ethanol production and distribution when only 5 percent of the cars on the road today can run on E85.

I’m assuming NAFB’ers are seeing the value in this new form of audio and video distribution since they gave an iPod and Bose docking station away at the recent NAMA convention. BTW, the winner was Kate Nelson with Charleston/Orwig. The NAFB study also shows continued strong use of the broadcast medium by farmers.

If you want to learn more about this whole podcasting thing I recommend Spinfluencer. This link is to a post the author, Eric Schwartzman, just wrote on his talk at ad:tech San Francisco Conference on this subject. Here’s a couple of nuggets I like:

Now, for the first time, practical, easy-to-use technologies, applications and services make it possible for anyone to leverage the power of the audio and video without a broadcast network infrastructure, and without buying a single minute of satellite time. With the introduction of audio and video podcasting, the distribution of electronic media becomes a cost-effective and efficient channel for individuals and organizations to engage and communicate with qualified audiences.

NAFB also has its new directory (pictured) available. Listen here to hear the latest NAFB President’s Report.

NAFB, Podcasts

Comments 3

  1. My good friend Chuck is right on the money – the terrestrial broadcasters will trumpet this as extremely low iPod usage. This number will grow at an increasingly rapid rate. We’ve joined Chuck and his ilk in blogging and podcasting – in fact, we’re staking our reputation on this bleeding edge of the new media revolution. The mainstream media no longer has a stranglehold on thought in mainstream America. Farmers are consumers of goods and services, too. Particularly as the growth of rural broadband increases, be it through expansion of cable/DSL, rising adoption of satellite services like AgriStar, or when broadband over powerline becomes available, farmers will flock to the new media and new technology. They pilot $200,000 combines with $60,000 guidance systems for crying out loud – you don’t think they can manage an iPod?

  2. My good friend Chuck is right on the money – the terrestrial broadcasters will trumpet this as extremely low iPod usage. This number will grow at an increasingly rapid rate. We’ve joined Chuck and his ilk in blogging and podcasting – in fact, we’re staking our reputation on this bleeding edge of the new media revolution. The mainstream media no longer has a stranglehold on thought in mainstream America. Farmers are consumers of goods and services, too. Particularly as the growth of rural broadband increases, be it through expansion of cable/DSL, rising adoption of satellite services like AgriStar, or when broadband over powerline becomes available, farmers will flock to the new media and new technology. They pilot $200,000 combines with $60,000 guidance systems for crying out loud – you don’t think they can manage an iPod?

  3. My good friend Chuck is right on the money – the terrestrial broadcasters will trumpet this as extremely low iPod usage. This number will grow at an increasingly rapid rate. We’ve joined Chuck and his ilk in blogging and podcasting – in fact, we’re staking our reputation on this bleeding edge of the new media revolution. The mainstream media no longer has a stranglehold on thought in mainstream America. Farmers are consumers of goods and services, too. Particularly as the growth of rural broadband increases, be it through expansion of cable/DSL, rising adoption of satellite services like AgriStar, or when broadband over powerline becomes available, farmers will flock to the new media and new technology. They pilot $200,000 combines with $60,000 guidance systems for crying out loud – you don’t think they can manage an iPod?

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